My summary of Sojo before using it? I believe Sojo is a app focused on sustainable clothing; helping people resell their clothes or repair them.

Image for post
Image for post

How does Sojo explain itself in the first minute? “Clothing alterations and repairs, made easy” is what it says on Sojo’s landing screen, followed by a “Get started!” button.

How does Sojo work? In Step 1, users select and order what alteration or repair they need done.


My summary of Clockwise before using it? I expect a product that helps me manage my calendar and my tasks.

How does Clockwise explain itself in the first minute? “Escape the cha0s of work and find your focus with Clockwise” reads the main strap-line on https://www.getclockwise.com/. I then read that Clockwise is a smart calendar assistant, and there’s the promise that Clockwise will free up my time.

Image for post
Image for post

How does Clockwise work?


Image for post
Image for post

Reading the great recommendation by Richard Rumelt — author of “Good Strategy, Bad Strategy” — encouraged me to pick up “How To Be Strategic”. This book came out in October last year, written by Fred Pelard, who specialises in strategic thinking and works with a range of business on their strategies. In “How To Be Strategic”, Pelard covers the strategic process, complemented with useful techniques from strategy experts like Barbara Minto and Eric Ries.

I personally found the first half of the book the most helpful. In its chapters Pelard describes how being strategic is a mindset, it’s a way…


My summary of Faire before using it? I think Faire is a marketplace not too dissimilar to eBay, Depop or Etsy. The biggest difference being that Fairy is a B2B marketplace, so I expect more of a focus on wholesale and product categories geared towards businesses.

How does Faire explain itself in the first minute? When I go to the Faire website it says “Your one-stop shop for wholesale” on its homepage, above the fold. This strap line is followed by two calls to action: “sign up to the shop” and “apply as a brand”. …


Plenty of books and blog posts have been written about decision making. How does one make a decision? How do you know you’ve made the right decision? I recently read “Creating Great Choices” by Jennifer Riel and Roger Martin which inspired me to write this toolkit post. If you think about it, traditional decision making often follows these stages to get to a single choice or answer:


Image for post
Image for post

With the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, I wonder whether fashion rental services will recover anytime soon. The likes of Rent the Runway, My Wardrobe HQ and HURR specialise in servicing those customers that don’t want to buy an outfit for irregular occasions like weddings or gala dinners, so-called ‘buy-once wear-once’ events.

Now that these special occasions have been put on hold and that most of us don’t really leave our homes at the moment, the need to ‘borrow’ clothes has declined significantly. On the other hand, with an increased focus on (fashion) sustainability, there’s still a significant market for and appeal…


I’m sure most of us will have been in a post-mortem at some point in our careers, to look back on a particular project or event. Derived from the medical world, the purpose of a post-mortem is to analyse a project and explain as well as document what happened. A detailed and thorough post-mortem takes place soon after a project or a campaign has been completed, the idea being that we can learn most in hindsight. …


Image for post
Image for post

Following the hugely successful “Inspired: How To Create Tech Products Customers Love” internationally renown product management guru Marty Cagan has just published “Empowered: Ordinary People, Extraordinary Products”. Together with Chris Jones, Cagan captures how the best product companies approach technology and empower product teams. Cagan and Jones are probably in the best position to see a stark difference between the technology-powered products created by the best companies and the products created by most companies. …


‘So, what is trust? We could say that a person or organization trusts another when both sides have reason to expect that neither will take advantage of the other, and, whenever possible, will even do things that advance the other’s interests.’ Brigitte Jordan

Image for post
Image for post
Credit: Joshua Hoehne, https://unsplash.com/@mrthetrain

Trusted relationships are critical, in every profession and in every walk of life. In my latest book “Managing Product = Managing Tension” I go into the detail of four key ways in which we can both create and maintain trusted relationships: influencing without authority, shared goals, transparency and psychological safety.

Influence without authority

We will need to…


Image for post
Image for post

A few years ago I worked with a team member who expressed his struggle to work with another colleague. “I don’t know whether it’s his Mediterranean temperament, but when he talks it all feels so brusque,” he said of our colleague. This is just my own example, but it’s exactly the kind of scenario which Erin Meyer’s book “The Culture Map” (2014) addresses in great detail. In “The Culture Map: Decoding How People Think, Lead, And Get Things Done Across Culture” Meyer uses an eight-scale framework. …

MAA1

Product at ASOS, author of "My Product Management Toolkit", family, boxing and founder of @hiphoplistings and blogging via http://t.co/uGr5nRye

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store