Book review: “Product Roadmaps Relaunched”

  • Put the organisation’s plans in a strategic context
  • Focus on delivering value to customers and the organisation
  • Embrace learning as part of a successful product development process
  • Rally the organisation a single set of priorities
  • Get customers excited about the product’s direction
  • Make promises product teams aren’t confident they will deliver on
  • Require a wasteful process of up-front design and estimation
  • Be conflated with a project plan or a release plan
  • Product vision — This is the overarching vision that guides the product roadmap.
  • Business objectives — Having well defined goals on the roadmap, will help you and your organisation to measure progress.
  • Broad timeframes — Broad timeframes like calendar quarters or Now, Next and Later offer guidance about timings without committing to very specific deadlines.
  • Themes — I like the authors’ suggestion to ask the question “What would need to be true for our product to realise its vision and attain its business activities?” Themes can be defined as customer needs or problems for the product to address.
  • Disclaimer—Roadmaps can have a caveat just to make it very clear to any stakeholders, other team, etc. that anything in the roadmap is subject to change and evolve.
  • Features — Personally, I’m not a big fan of having lots of features on a roadmap, mostly because it will limit you and your team to come up with solutions, with people expecting whatever is on the roadmap to get delivered. The book explains that “features and solutions are the specific deliverables that will fulfil the needs and solve the problems identified in the roadmap themes.
  • Stage of development — By including labels such as “discovery”, “design”, or “prototyping” on a roadmap, stakeholders and other people not close to day-to-day product development — should be able to see at a glance where the product is at.
  • Confidence — Indicating the level of confidence you have in your availability to address each item or theme on the roadmap in the next release is a great way to help offset the sentiment that once it’s on paper, it’s a promise.
  • Target customers — Highlighting which customer segment(s) your product is looking to address, really helps with the ‘communication’ aspect of your product roadmap. Instead of just seeing a bunch, you can now tell more of a story about upcoming themes and impact on specific customers.
  • Product areas — A large and complex product — or a new product where basic functionality is still being laid down in many areas — many benefit from a roadmap where themes or features are annotated per specific area of the product.
  • Do we have enough understanding of the need and possible solutions to feel confident in a particular solution?
  • Do we have any validated solutions from previous release plans that did not get completed and need to be carried over?
  • Do we have any validated infrastructure needs?
  • Do we have any mandates from decision-making stakeholders that must be addressed?
  • What is the likelihood that this solution will be changed, postponed, or dropped from the schedule (i.e. what is your confidence)?

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MAA1

MAA1

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Product at Intercom, author of "My Product Management Toolkit" and “Managing Product = Managing Tension” — see https://bit.ly/3gH2dOD.